City of San Diego’s Homeless Shelters and Services Programs

The City of San Diego’s (City) Homeless Shelters and Services Programs provide temporary shelter and supportive services to some of the City’s most vulnerable residents.

The San Diego Housing Commission (SDHC) administers these programs through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the City that first took effect on July 1, 2010.

In addition, on November 14, 2017, the San Diego City Council authorized a separate MOU for SDHC to oversee, administer, and manage the City’s Temporary Bridge Shelters. The first amendment to this MOU was authorized by the City Council on March 20, 2018, to also address the duties of the City and SDHC concerning the City’s Storage Connect Center, previously known as a Transitional Storage Center, at 116 South 20th Street.

City’s Temporary Bridge Shelters

The three City Temporary Bridge Shelters provide up to 674 beds to address the immediate shelter needs of San Diegans experiencing homelessness:

  • 16th Street and Newton Avenue, operated by Alpha Project, opened on December 1, 2017 and provides up to 324 beds for single adults
  • 2801 ½ Sports Arena Boulevard, operated by Veterans Village of San Diego, opened on December 22, 2017, and provides up to 200 beds for Veterans
  • 14th and Commercial Street, operated by Father Joe’s Villages, opened on January 3, 2018, and provides up to 150 beds for families and single women

As individuals exit the shelters to permanent housing with the “Housing First” model of addressing homelessness, the shelters will be able to help additional San Diegans who are experiencing homelessness.

San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer first announced these shelters on September 13, 2017, to address homelessness and combat the regional Hepatitis A outbreak in the City of San Diego.

Temporary Bridge Shelters provide a safe place to stay – or a “bridge” – for individuals or families who are enrolled in a permanent housing program, but have not yet moved into a permanent unit while they await permanent housing placement.

City’s Year-Round Interim Housing Program

The Year-Round Interim Housing Program provides 350 beds for adult men and women who are experiencing homelessness.

The program includes 140 beds that are set aside for homeless Veterans.

This permanent facility is operated by Father Joe’s Villages at the Paul Mirabile Center on their downtown San Diego campus.

Residents have access to supportive services, such as on-site “housing navigators” to help them prepare for the next appropriate housing option, including rapid rehousing, transitional housing, or permanent supportive housing.

The City’s Year-Round Interim Housing Program replaced two temporary Winter Shelter tents, which closed on April 1, 2015.

Connections Housing Downtown

Connections Housing Downtown is a City-sponsored, one-stop housing and services center for San Diegans experiencing homelessness.

Operated by People Assisting the Homeless (PATH), Connections Housing Downtown provides 73 permanent affordable studios, 16 interim housing units for individuals with special needs, and 134 interim beds for men and women.

SDHC awarded 73 federal Project-Based Housing Vouchers to provide rental assistance for the 73 studios and 16 Transitional Project-Based Housing Vouchers to support the interim housing special needs units.

In addition, SDHC awarded up to 50 federal Sponsor-Based Housing Vouchers to PATH to help formerly homeless San Diegans who have stabilized their lives and are ready to transition out of Connections Housing.

Connections Housing residents also have access to an on-site health clinic operated by Family Health Centers of San Diego that serves the public. 

Watch the News Conference

Cortez Hill Family Center

The Cortez Hill Family Center provides short-term housing and services to help families experiencing homelessness stabilize their lives and transition into longer-term or permanent housing.

Families receive supportive services, including case management, on- and off-site counseling services, referrals to additional service providers, as well as daily meals and child care.

Housing units are available for 45 families at a time. Families are able to reside at Cortez Hill Family Center for up to 120 days.

Cortez Hill Family Center is operated by YWCA of San Diego County.

Day Center Facility for Homeless Adults

The Day Center Facility for Homeless Adults, formerly known as Neil Good Day Center, provides a variety of services, connecting adults who are experiencing homelessness, or are at risk of homelessness, with resources that meet basic and longer-term needs, such as:

  • Case management and housing navigation
  • Showers and bathrooms
  • A place to pick up mail
  • Classrooms and information or referrals

This center is operated by Father Joe’s Villages.

City’s Homeless Transitional Storage Center – 252 16th Street

The Homeless Transitional Storage Center, located at 252 16th Street in Downtown San Diego, provides a safe place for individuals who are experiencing homelessness to keep their belongings as they look for work, attend classes, or meet with a service provider or doctor.

This center provides lockers and storage bins for more than 400 homeless individuals to store their belongings, and as of March 2018, had a waiting list of more than 100 individuals.

Think Dignity operates the downtown storage center.

Watch the News Conference

City’s Storage Connect Center – 116 South 20th Street

The City’s Storage Connect Center, previously known as a Transitional Storage Center, opened on June 13, 2018.

On March 20, 2018, the San Diego City Council authorized this storage center at 116 South 20th Street, no earlier than June 13, 2018, to provide up to 500 storage units for San Diegans experiencing homelessness.

In the first 90 days of operation, individuals must be referred to the center by a service provider or City staff (such as the San Diego Police Department) or currently be on the waiting list at the storage center operated by Think Dignity.

The City Council also directed SDHC to evaluate, in conjunction with the City, the cost and feasibility of making the facility’s existing restrooms available to clients of the facility, and if it is not financially feasible, to evaluate alternatives to provide restroom access on or near the site.

In addition, the City Council directed the Mayor to follow the Community Impact Strategy that was included in a memorandum to the City Council on March 20.

Mental Health Systems operates the Storage Connect Center.

Let's get you there…

I am looking for…